Exegesis on Percy's Reliques

We are a ciskin, transpatriarchalist, aprivilege, gendersane Emperor. We enjoy posting pictures of attractive women, art, and retro stylings, and whatever else We wish.

The appropriate pronouns for Us is the pluralis maiestatis, for We are Your Majesty.

July 18, 2014 at 6:52pm
189 notes
Reblogged from cerebralzero
cerebralzero:

Accurate

cerebralzero:

Accurate

(via rtrixie)

July 11, 2014 at 11:42am
128 notes
Reblogged from rumple-dearie
uncivilwar13:

joukkotuhoase:

xylophoneuniverse:

aghostlyreflection:

rumple-dearie:

"As Germany is nearing the beginning of their defeat in WWII, Nazi architect/Armaments Minister Albert Speer and Hitler’s close relationship is becoming strained. It’s only when Speer threatens to resign that their true feelings for one another are made clear. In a meeting with Field Marshall Milch, who has been sent to tell Hitler about Speer’s possible resignation, Hitler tells Milch to "tell Speer I love him." As the Russian army closes in on Berlin, and with Hitler’s impending suicide in the Fuhrerbunker, Speer leaves his wife and children to fly into Berlin just to say goodbye to Hitler. Years after Hitler’s death, Speer refers to himself as Hitler’s "unrequited love." This is the story of the Nazi that apologised and the evil dictator that confessed his love to him. This is The Fault in our War Plans.”- “I wrote this. Five stars.” - Wolters.
-“Fucking Speer. God I hate him so much.” - Goebbels.
(I learned about Hitler’s ‘professional’ relationship with architect Albert Speer this week and a few very questionable things that were said/happened between them… So I made a thing. I’m not even sorry.)

I can’t think of anything clever to add to this masterpiece
except one : WHAT IS THE SHIP NAME ??

pleash tell me where to buy this so that way I can purchase the flippin’ bejesus out of it

logged in on tumblr and this was basically the first thing I saw on my dashTHE DAY IS SAVED


OHMYGOD

uncivilwar13:

joukkotuhoase:

xylophoneuniverse:

aghostlyreflection:

rumple-dearie:

"As Germany is nearing the beginning of their defeat in WWII, Nazi architect/Armaments Minister Albert Speer and Hitler’s close relationship is becoming strained. It’s only when Speer threatens to resign that their true feelings for one another are made clear. In a meeting with Field Marshall Milch, who has been sent to tell Hitler about Speer’s possible resignation, Hitler tells Milch to "tell Speer I love him." As the Russian army closes in on Berlin, and with Hitler’s impending suicide in the Fuhrerbunker, Speer leaves his wife and children to fly into Berlin just to say goodbye to Hitler. Years after Hitler’s death, Speer refers to himself as Hitler’s "unrequited love."

This is the story of the Nazi that apologised and the evil dictator that confessed his love to him. This is The Fault in our War Plans.”

- “I wrote this. Five stars.” - Wolters.

-“Fucking Speer. God I hate him so much.” - Goebbels.


(I learned about Hitler’s ‘professional’ relationship with architect Albert Speer this week and a few very questionable things that were said/happened between them… So I made a thing. I’m not even sorry.)

I can’t think of anything clever to add to this masterpiece

except one : WHAT IS THE SHIP NAME ??

pleash tell me where to buy this so that way I can purchase the flippin’ bejesus out of it

logged in on tumblr and this was basically the first thing I saw on my dash
THE DAY IS SAVED

OHMYGOD

11:40am
319 notes
Reblogged from literallyunbelievable
literallyunbelievable:

what an awful picture 

literallyunbelievable:

what an awful picture 

July 10, 2014 at 10:41pm
1 note
The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | Phreaking Ma Bell
When David needs to make a quick free call, he uses an old phone phreaking classic. After finding a discarded soda pull tab, he shorts the receiver against the coin slot to produce a dial tone without a quarter. It’s one of the few real hacks depicted in movies that actually worked. Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | Phreaking Ma Bell
When David needs to make a quick free call, he uses an old phone phreaking classic. After finding a discarded soda pull tab, he shorts the receiver against the coin slot to produce a dial tone without a quarter. It’s one of the few real hacks depicted in movies that actually worked. Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

10:40pm
1 note
The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | Olympus Pearlcorder S902
Olympus invented the microcassette in 1969, and its Pearlcorder line would be massively popular for the next three decades. David uses this one to record the sound produced by a door lock panel outside the NORAD infirmary. He then unlocks the door by playing the recording back to it, and escapes. Crafty! Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | Olympus Pearlcorder S902
Olympus invented the microcassette in 1969, and its Pearlcorder line would be massively popular for the next three decades. David uses this one to record the sound produced by a door lock panel outside the NORAD infirmary. He then unlocks the door by playing the recording back to it, and escapes. Crafty! Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

10:40pm
0 notes
The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | Sony Trinitron KV-1711
For whatever reason, the filmmakers couldn’t (or didn’t want to) use the Sony logo on this 17-inch CRT in the Lightman living room. So David and his dad learn of a prophylactic recycling center fire and a full-scale nuclear alert on their “Amatron” Trinitron set. Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | Sony Trinitron KV-1711
For whatever reason, the filmmakers couldn’t (or didn’t want to) use the Sony logo on this 17-inch CRT in the Lightman living room. So David and his dad learn of a prophylactic recycling center fire and a full-scale nuclear alert on their “Amatron” Trinitron set. Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

10:39pm
0 notes
The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | NEC-branded version of the HP 2912A monitor
Sharp-eyed viewers will have noticed this NEC-branded version of the HP 82912A monitor in the library while David is researching Professor Falken. Technically, HP didn’t have any products showcased in the movie, but an HP 9845C desktop computer running BASIC powered the graphics on the massive screens in the NORAD war room. Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | NEC-branded version of the HP 2912A monitor
Sharp-eyed viewers will have noticed this NEC-branded version of the HP 82912A monitor in the library while David is researching Professor Falken. Technically, HP didn’t have any products showcased in the movie, but an HP 9845C desktop computer running BASIC powered the graphics on the massive screens in the NORAD war room. Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

10:38pm
0 notes
The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | When it was pointed out that the acoustic coupler used in the scene was hopelessly outdated, the IMSAI folks added the fake modem in the previous slide. Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | When it was pointed out that the acoustic coupler used in the scene was hopelessly outdated, the IMSAI folks added the fake modem in the previous slide. Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

10:38pm
0 notes
The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | …a 17-inch Electrohome monitor, and a fake modem, which was actually a repainted 1200 baud Cermetek 212A. | WIRED.com

The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | …a 17-inch Electrohome monitor, and a fake modem, which was actually a repainted 1200 baud Cermetek 212A. | WIRED.com

10:38pm
0 notes
The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | …the IMSAI FDC-2 dual floppy drive (for loading software on 8-inch floppies)… Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com

The Glorious ’80s Gadgets That Made WarGames So Great | …the IMSAI FDC-2 dual floppy drive (for loading software on 8-inch floppies)… Screengrab: WIRED | WIRED.com